equality is sexy

"Like an ongoing comprehensive education of men of what healthy, respectful manhood is all about, and it starts with how we view women. Our language is important. For instance, when a guy says ‘you throw the ball like a girl,’ or ‘you’re a little sissy,’ it reflects an attitude that devalues women. And attitudes will eventually manifest in some fashion."
— CBS host James Brown calls on men to change their behavior toward women. (via contentment-of-cats)

jdotslack:

impressionist:

slashemup:

I’m a black man and it’s time to be accountable. It’s always left to black women to do and say everything. I decided to make these an post them, where i live, and travel. I want to state that the language is of this area (chicagoland) an directed solely at young black men who live here so it maybe off putting to people not from here. with that said im not posting all of the fliers here. Feel free to save. print an post these at your convince. This is part of SEU Blackstorm project. More to come.. - Yumii

You can follow our progess and future events here.

Slashemup.tumblr.com

Facebook.com/slashemuppunx

these are dope. seen em in hyde park, need to be national. yall know how it feels to see a sign defining misogyny and with a black power fist on it when youre just walking down the street?? exciting as fuck

I’m gonna start posting these around campus.


sh4d0w-n1ght asked: "oh dear, what happened"

thescariestroom:

Yesterday we had a referendum on whether Scotland should become an independent country. I don’t know where you’re from or anything or how much you know about this so I’ll direct you to this post which will let you know a bit about Westminster politics, etc. 

The vote was 55% no 45% yes. The only age group who actually had an overall no vote was over 60s which means the BBC did what they set out to do and terrified the elderly (who generally only have access to biased news sources, not social media) into thinking they would lose their pensions if they voted yes, which is a lie.

Today the country felt dismal. I saw people openly crying on the bus. We had such a strong, positive yes campaign and there was excitement for change before the results were released.

And now Ed Miliband has said, less than ten hours later, that he does not support further devolution for Scotland a.k.a what we were promised if we voted no. David Cameron says it will happen but that man talks so much shit his face should be brown and sticky.

And to top it all off, a bunch of unionists were in George Square earlier today taunting and mocking yes supporters and singing sectarian songs, making nazi salutes, and there are rumours of rioting and a yes supporter being stabbed, although this remains unconfirmed,

Basically, we have dropped our trousers and bent over for Westminster once again, ignored the cries for help of the four districts in Scotland who did vote yes and also happen to be the poorest areas (Glasgow, West Dumbartonshire, North Lanarkshire, and Dundee)

I am ashamed of my country. I never thought my pride in being Scottish would ever be dampened but here I sit today cringing at Edinburgh and Midlothian’s results.

Gonna publish this so everyone can see, hope that’s ok.


barafurbear:

anotheralexandros:

tommytv:

nychealth:

Let’s stop HIV in New York City

  • If you are HIV-negative, PEP and PrEP can help you stay that way.
  • If you are HIV-positive, PEP and PrEP can help protect your partners.

 

Daily PrEP

PrEP is a daily pill that can help keep you HIV-negative as long as you take it every day.

  • Ask your doctor if PrEP (Pre-exposure Prophylaxis) may be right for you.
  • Condoms give you additional protection against HIV, other sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancy.

 

Emergency PEP

If you are HIV-negative and think you were exposed to HIV, immediately go to a clinic or emergency room and ask for PEP (Post-exposure  Prophylaxis).

  • PEP can stop HIV if started within 36 hours of exposure.
  • You continue taking PEP for 28 days.

Many insurance plans including Medicaid cover PEP and PrEP. Assistance may be available if you are uninsured. Visit NYC Health’s website to find out where to get PrEP or PEP in New York City.

This is such a giant step that barely any people know about it seems, so amazing to see progress in the treatment of HIV

I honestly thought this might be exaggeration but the CDC says that PrEP is 92% effective. Damn. Damn.

reblogging because this deserves waaaay more attention D:


problackgirl:

"real men dont rape" actually, real men do rape. they do. men rape. it isn’t done by ~fake mythical special brand of evil~ men, it’s done by real men, men who may seem nice, men who you think you can trust, men you know, men who you’re close to. real men do rape. that’s the problem


colourlssgreenideas:

riots are breaking out in glasgow right now, scottish flags are being burned, people are making nazi salutes, there is racism and sectarianism and god knows what else, there are supposed stabbings, people are being beaten up purely for voting Yes, but the bbc has decided that a news story more worthy of being reported is the first iphone 6 owner dropping his new phone. the anti-scottish bias from the bbc is reaching new levels of absurdity


petemaximoff:

just so you know what is going on in my country right now:

  • votes came in for independence 45% yes 55% no
  • media very “”no”” centred and bias
  • unionists are now attacking yes voters
  • a seventeen year old girl has been stabbed
  • they are burning our saltire giving nazi salutes
  • our first minister resigns

please signal boost this 

posted 1 day ago via leofjtz with 22,682 notes

bendrowning:

My yes voting neighbours car has just been smashed by a squad of 12 no voters. It’s suspected they’ve smashed about 4 more on the way. My uncle almost got attacked for trying to chase them off. I’m in Livingston and the police are not coming
This is not Glasgow this is 35 miles away
Please everyone in Scotland brace yourselves and hide all yes stickers


sixstrategos:

this is what is going on in scotland right now.


jean-luc-gohard:

parskis:

I honestly can’t believe this right now. I was complaining to my bf about some Kotex tampons I had used, going on a bit of a rant about how bad they were, and on a whim I decided to go to the website and leave a review so other people who might get them would know better.
I’ve never written a tampon review in my life (it’s not something I ever anticipated doing) so I had a little fun getting very passionate about my thoughts, and then went to submit…. Only to receive the words: ‘Your review text contains inappropriate language.’ I was confused at first, I mean I was pretty emphatic, but I didn’t cuss at all… and then I realized: I had typed the word ‘vagina.’ 

You can’t type the word ‘vagina’ on a TAMPON review because it’s considered inappropriate.

KOTEX, a company that makes OVER A BILLION DOLLARS A YEAR primarily selling products to people with vaginas, thinks that someone typing the word “VAGINA” in a review of a product that goes IN THEIR VAGINA is being inappropriate and needs to be censored.

I retyped “v*gina” with an asterisk like it was a swear word, submitted and it went to preview mode with no problem. But I’m still kind of in shock… Honestly, what is wrong with Kotex that they think they need to protect tampon users from the word ‘vagina’?

If you didn’t think our society’s fear of the vagina was absurd, here you go. It’s cartoonish.



crystalqueer:

Photos and final product for Mq. & Mrs.’s amazing lgbtq coloring book for kids.

Model : Alicia Michele


"Feminism is not about who opens the jar.

It is not about who pays for the date. It is not about who moves the couch. It is not about who kills the bugs. It is not about who cooks the dinner. It’s not even about who stays home with the kids, as long as the decision was made together, after thinking carefully about your situation and coming to an agreement that makes sense for your particular marriage and family.

It is about making sure that nobody ever has to do anything by “default” because of their gender. The stronger person should move the couch. The person who enjoys cooking more, has more time for it, and/or is better at it should do the cooking. Sometimes the stronger person is male, sometimes not. Sometimes the person who is best suited for cooking is female, sometimes not. You should do what works.

But it is also about letting people know that it is okay to change. If you’re a woman who wants to become stronger, that’s great. If you’re a man who wants to learn how to cook, that’s also great. You might start out with a relationship where the guy opens all the jars and the girl cooks all the meals, but you might find that you want to try something else. So try it."

nowinexile:

The last words said by Black youth before they were murdered by vigilantes/Policemen . Rest in peace. [Source: Shirin Barghi]


padaviya:

When I read Mindy Kaling’s words in her interview with Flare magazine, I and many other reproductive rights advocates were confused and frustrated:

“It would be demeaning to the topic [of abortion] to talk about it in a half-hour sitcom.”

How would it be “demeaning” to talk about abortion in a sitcom about a gynecologist’s office? Many sitcoms have talked openly about abortion, including Girls and Sex and the City, as well as recent films, like Obvious Child. In its first two seasons, Kaling’s show, The Mindy Project, has tackled many issues related to reproductive health care, such as the distribution of condoms, birth control, and teen sex. Why not abortion?

But then I remembered, it always comes back to stigma—in this case, abortion provider stigma.

Half of women in the United States will experience an unintended pregnancy, and one in three will have an abortion before she turns 45. Kaling’s character, Dr. Mindy Lahiri, would surely see patients who want pregnancy options counseling, and some of those patients would likely seek an abortion. Why wouldn’t she provide them with one in her practice, or at least refer them to an abortion provider?

Actually, Dr. Lahiri’s behavior is reflective of a real-life norm: There are many OB-GYNs who don’t provide abortions based on fear of violence, lack of training, or their own internalized stigma toward abortion care. A 2011 survey found that only one in seven OB-GYNs are willing or able to provide abortions. However, 97 percent of OB-GYNs stated that they have encountered people seeking abortion care.

One of the reasons for this is lack of access to medical training on abortion. In 2009, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) found that only 32 percent of medical schools include at least one lecture on abortion in their curricula. The group also found that 45 percent of schools offer clinical experience in providing abortion care, though participation at those schools is low because the program is opt-in rather than integrated into the curricula like most other forms of health care. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education does require that OB-GYN residency programs offer training in family planning and abortion. Still, residency programs can opt out of providing this training in-house, forcing students to attend training at another program.

Even when clinicians do receive training to provide abortions, they face barriers in offering those service to patients. Because of the stigma associated with abortion, many hospitals, especially religiously affiliated ones, refuse to allow providers to offer abortion care.

“Private practice groups as well as hospitals routinely prohibit their group members and staff from performing abortions either because of institutional religious affiliations or because they fear protest from the community,” explained Dr. Kathleen Morrell, a reproductive health advocacy fellow at Physicians for Reproductive Health. “For example, a colleague of mine who received abortion training and wanted to offer her patients comprehensive reproductive health care joined a private practice that refused to let her offer abortion care. The other doctors in the practice were concerned about possible backlash from the community if they became known as an abortion provider.”

So perhaps Dr. Lahiri’s colleagues don’t want her to provide abortions. Wouldn’t that make an interesting plot device!

Backlash from colleagues and the community is a constant fear and barrier for providers. The stigma of abortion leads them to receive death threats, see protests outside of their clinics, and fear for the safety of their family and friends. While many providers are proud of the compassionate care they are able to offer their patients, abortion providers often keep their work a secret to alleviate some of the impact of the stigma. Understandably, this secrecy allows them to live a more normal life and continue doing their work, yet it can also perpetuate stigma.

“When abortion providers do not disclose their work in everyday encounters, their silence perpetuates a stereotype that abortion work is unusual or deviant, or that legitimate, mainstream doctors do not perform abortions,” writes Dr. Lisa Harris on the cycle of silence and stigma. “This contributes to marginalization of abortion providers within medicine and the ongoing targeting of providers for harassment and violence. This reinforces the reluctance to disclose abortion work, and the cycle continues.”

But there are providers who refuse to let stigma and shame keep them from providing care. In a recent interview with Esquire, Dr. Willie Parker, who provides abortion care at the last abortion clinic in Mississippi, spoke frankly about how stigma affects his work, the role his faith plays in abortion care, and why he began providing abortions full-time the day Dr. George Tiller was murdered in 2009. “The protesters say they’re opposed to abortion because they’re Christian,” Parker said. “It’s hard for them to accept that I do abortions because I’m a Christian.”

It’s media coverage like the Esquire profile of Dr. Parker and abortion plot lines in television shows and movies that can help to disrupt the cycle of abortion stigma in our society. “Media can shift stigma by portraying abortion as most people experience it: normal, manageable, social, and not the end of the world,” Steph Herold, deputy director of the Sea Change Program, told me. “Positive portrayals of abortion provision may even help providers feel less isolated, and reinforce the simple truth that providing abortion should be part of routine health care.”

Abortion stigma may be keeping Mindy Kaling from talking about abortion on her show, but if she were to do so it could help educate the public, inspire future providers, and fight abortion provider stigma. (Dr. Parker as a guest star, anyone?) Also, I’ll bet viewers would love to see Dr. Lahiri tackle an issue so many of them have experienced.

posted 5 days ago via padaviya with 15 notes